doomandgloomfromthetomb:

The Ballad of Geeshie and Elvie by John Jeremiah Sullivan
A well-nigh unbelievable journey into the depths of pre-war American blues is now online and at newsstands in the New York Times Magazine today. Sullivan really is the best writer out there right now and he may have outdone himself with this one, both deepening the mystery at the heart of the story and stripping away any romanticized BS that sometimes accompanies blues writing. Whatever, just go read it! At the bottom of the page you can download mp3s by the article’s titular singers, Elvie “L.V.” Thomas and Geeshie Wiley. You may also want to check out Sullivan’s Unknown Bards piece, published in Harper’s a few years back, which can now serve as a prelude to the NY Times feature. 

doomandgloomfromthetomb:

The Ballad of Geeshie and Elvie by John Jeremiah Sullivan

A well-nigh unbelievable journey into the depths of pre-war American blues is now online and at newsstands in the New York Times Magazine today. Sullivan really is the best writer out there right now and he may have outdone himself with this one, both deepening the mystery at the heart of the story and stripping away any romanticized BS that sometimes accompanies blues writing. Whatever, just go read it! At the bottom of the page you can download mp3s by the article’s titular singers, Elvie “L.V.” Thomas and Geeshie Wiley. You may also want to check out Sullivan’s Unknown Bards piece, published in Harper’s a few years back, which can now serve as a prelude to the NY Times feature. 

theparisreview:

Today in interesting mash-ups: Batman by Dostoyevsky. (via)

theparisreview:

Today in interesting mash-ups: Batman by Dostoyevsky. (via)

ruiraiox:

zombiesenelghetto: Devo and Brian Eno, ca 1978

ruiraiox:

zombiesenelghetto: Devo and Brian Eno, ca 1978

(Source: zombiesenelghetto)

lareviewofbooks:


For the wholehearted bibliophile, there’s something especially satisfying in reading a book about the love of books, or a story that distills the longing to tell and be told stories. Lebanese author Rabih Alameddine’s latest novel, An Unnecessary Woman, is precisely this: a paean to the transformative power of reading, to the intellectual asylum from one’s circumstances found in the life of the mind. However, it’s also a shrewd reflection on the limitations of a retreat from the world of people into the rarified heights of ideas.

Ivan Kenneally and Priyanka Kumar discuss building a life out of books in Rabih Alameddine’s new novel, An Unnecessary Woman, in two reviews: "Not Quite Lost in Translation" and "Reading ‘Anna Karenina’ in Beirut."

lareviewofbooks:

For the wholehearted bibliophile, there’s something especially satisfying in reading a book about the love of books, or a story that distills the longing to tell and be told stories. Lebanese author Rabih Alameddine’s latest novel, An Unnecessary Woman, is precisely this: a paean to the transformative power of reading, to the intellectual asylum from one’s circumstances found in the life of the mind. However, it’s also a shrewd reflection on the limitations of a retreat from the world of people into the rarified heights of ideas.

Ivan Kenneally and Priyanka Kumar discuss building a life out of books in Rabih Alameddine’s new novel, An Unnecessary Woman, in two reviews: "Not Quite Lost in Translation" and "Reading ‘Anna Karenina’ in Beirut."

powells:

gehayi:

atalantapendrag:

fatanarchy:

THIS IS WHAT ANARCHY LOOKS LIKE.

Hope for the future.

This kid is incredible.

Heroic.

powells:

gehayi:

atalantapendrag:

fatanarchy:

THIS IS WHAT ANARCHY LOOKS LIKE.

Hope for the future.

This kid is incredible.

Heroic.

(Source: joys-r-us, via maudnewton)

thepenguinpress:

San Francisco in Mark Twain’s Time via The San Francisco Chronicle 

Market Street, as seen from Montgomery Street. “The city had been a refuge in the 1860s,” Tarnoff writes, but by the mid-1870s, “it looked more like a dumping ground. People from other parts of the country washed up on its shores looking for work, swelling the ranks of the poor. By 1877, San Francisco’s unemployment rate was as high as 25 percent. … ‘Bankruptcy, suicide, and murder and robberies were the order of the day,’ recalled one workingman. The city’s literary fortunes had undergone an equally steep decline. The last remnants of the Bohemian scene had vanished.”

For more information on The Bohemians: Mark Twain and the San Francisco Writers Who Reinvented American Literature by Ben Tarnoff, please click here

Photo: Courtesy of the Society of California Pioneers

Now reading.

sailorafrica:

WHAT THE FUCK

This floats my boat.

(Source: senhor-gasmo, via thebristolboard)

archiemcphee:

These intricate and extraordinarily beautiful embroidered silk balls are a form of Japanese folk art called Temari, which means “hand ball” in Japanese. These particular temari are even more impressive because they were handmade by a 92-year-old grandmother in Japan.

"Although she only learned this elaborate skill in her sixties, she has since created nearly 500 unique designs that have been photographed by her granddaughter NanaAkua. Impressive does not even begin to describe this feat of dexterity, imagination and keen eyesight. The difficult process of becoming a recognized temari craftsman in Japan is tedious and requires specific training and testing. This grandmother must certainly be one motivated and talented woman. And if that was not enough to garner your complete admiration, she now volunteers every week teaching others how to make their own temari.”

Temari have been made in Japan since the 7th century and are still highly valued and cherished as gifts symbolizing deep friendship and loyalty. They are traditionally given to children by their parents on New Year’s Day. Mothers place a small piece of paper with a secret goodwill wish for her child inside the tightly-wrapped ball. Alternately, some temari are made as noisemakers by placing rice grains or bells in the center.

Visit My Modern Metropolis to view more of NanaAkua’s photos of her grandmother’s beautiful handiwork and learn more about this stunning Japanese holiday tradition.

(via theremina)

millionsmillions:

Last week, we discussed how Teju Cole has mastered literary Twitter, and that was before we knew that he tweeted a 4,000-word essay on immigration. “A Piece of the Wall” is composed of 250 tweets written during a seven-hour period and starts with: “I hear the sound of faint bells in the distance. It is like a sound in a dream, or the jingling at the beginning of a Christmas song.”

millionsmillions:

Last week, we discussed how Teju Cole has mastered literary Twitter, and that was before we knew that he tweeted a 4,000-word essay on immigration. “A Piece of the Wall” is composed of 250 tweets written during a seven-hour period and starts with: “I hear the sound of faint bells in the distance. It is like a sound in a dream, or the jingling at the beginning of a Christmas song.”

fantagraphics:

thebristolboard:

Forgotten masterpieceComplete original art by Robert Crumb for “Pass the Jug,” Crumb’s first strip focused on ’20s and ’30s jazz musicians, originally printed in CoEvolution Quarterly #18, published by Stewart Brand, 1978. The story was later reprinted in Crumb’s one-man anthology, Best Buy Comics, published by Apex Novelties, February 1979.

Crumb