nitanahkohe

nitanahkohe:

these are really important and a big deal. people need to understand that when they purchase weed grown illegally, it often has negative ramifications on the communities it comes from.

these large grows on tribal lands have made it dangerous or impossible for tribal members to hunt and gather traditional plants and medicines in some places (particularly women seeking materials needed for baskets or regalia), compromised access to sacred sites, poisoned animals and water sources, and exacerbated problems with drug-related violence & gangs. my dad and my brother have been shot at while riding their bikes through the woods, we have found multiple illegal grows people started on our land, and the rates of shootings, domestic violence, and substance abuse have skyrocketed in our region as the drug industry grew, in the wake of what is now pervasive and chronic poverty and lack of opportunity.

weed does NOT exist in a vacuum, and is NOT a harmless plant. and don’t even talk to me about legalizing it unless you also have substantive plans to address the poverty, unemployment, and wealth/opportunity gaps that created and maintain this situation in the first place.

From 07-21-2014 to 07-24-2014, the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office joined the Bureau of Indian Affairs, California Department of Justice, California Fish and Wildlife Service, Marin County Sheriff’s Office, Humboldt County District Attorney’s Office, Yurok Police Department and Eureka Police Department in eradicating marijuana grows on Yurok Tribal Land and adjacent properties. The 35 officers served twenty Humboldt County Superior Court Search Warrants and nine Tribal Court search warrants during the four days. A total of 12,898 marijuana plants, over 300 pounds of processed marijuana and seven firearms were seized. Officers located extensive environmental damage at several search warrant locations, along with California Fish and Wildlife violations. No arrests were made.

seanhowe
seanhowe:

Thank You, Bobby Womack.
I made a list of only twelve of the many gifts for which I have the late, great Bobby Womack to thank.
1. Every note of your re-arrangement of “Fly Me To The Moon.” But especially the first note. And the way you pronounce “song” at 1:09. And the screams at 1:29 and 1:53. And the way you sing “Jupiter” each time. And your guitar sound at 1:38, definitely.
2.  The left-hand turn made three minutes and fourteen seconds into “That’s the Way I Feel About Cha.”
3. The bonkers monologues in “Fire and Rain” and “Facts Of Life/He’ll Be There When The Sun Goes Down,” and the way you launch into the melodies. 
4. This stripped-down, revelatory reinvention of “Across 110th Street.” 
5. The album of guitar instrumentals you recorded with Gabor Szabo. 
6. “He say the po-lice say we got to go, it’s ten after 2. Well, tell the po-lice to come on in: I can’t stop.”
7. All the songs you wrote for Wilson Pickett, like this.  
8. Your contributions to this track.  
9. “I Can’t Take It Like A Man” exists in some rarified fantasy intersection of Lorraine Ellison and ’68 Elvis.
10. The “run to the rock” parts of  “What You Gonna Do (When Your Love Is Gone.)” 
11.  Your appropriations of Burt Bacharach and Stevie Wonder snippets into your own songs. 
12. I saw you perform in December, just days before Christmas. You were 69 years old, and had acknowledged battles with addiction, diabetes, pneumonia, colon cancer, and dementia. But you did this anyway. Thank you.

seanhowe:

Thank You, Bobby Womack.

I made a list of only twelve of the many gifts for which I have the late, great Bobby Womack to thank.

1. Every note of your re-arrangement of “Fly Me To The Moon.” But especially the first note. And the way you pronounce “song” at 1:09. And the screams at 1:29 and 1:53. And the way you sing “Jupiter” each time. And your guitar sound at 1:38, definitely.

2.  The left-hand turn made three minutes and fourteen seconds into “That’s the Way I Feel About Cha.”

12.