seanhowe
seanhowe:

Thank You, Bobby Womack.
I made a list of only twelve of the many gifts for which I have the late, great Bobby Womack to thank.
1. Every note of your re-arrangement of “Fly Me To The Moon.” But especially the first note. And the way you pronounce “song” at 1:09. And the screams at 1:29 and 1:53. And the way you sing “Jupiter” each time. And your guitar sound at 1:38, definitely.
2.  The left-hand turn made three minutes and fourteen seconds into “That’s the Way I Feel About Cha.”
3. The bonkers monologues in “Fire and Rain” and “Facts Of Life/He’ll Be There When The Sun Goes Down,” and the way you launch into the melodies. 
4. This stripped-down, revelatory reinvention of “Across 110th Street.” 
5. The album of guitar instrumentals you recorded with Gabor Szabo. 
6. “He say the po-lice say we got to go, it’s ten after 2. Well, tell the po-lice to come on in: I can’t stop.”
7. All the songs you wrote for Wilson Pickett, like this.  
8. Your contributions to this track.  
9. “I Can’t Take It Like A Man” exists in some rarified fantasy intersection of Lorraine Ellison and ’68 Elvis.
10. The “run to the rock” parts of  “What You Gonna Do (When Your Love Is Gone.)” 
11.  Your appropriations of Burt Bacharach and Stevie Wonder snippets into your own songs. 
12. I saw you perform in December, just days before Christmas. You were 69 years old, and had acknowledged battles with addiction, diabetes, pneumonia, colon cancer, and dementia. But you did this anyway. Thank you.

seanhowe:

Thank You, Bobby Womack.

I made a list of only twelve of the many gifts for which I have the late, great Bobby Womack to thank.

1. Every note of your re-arrangement of “Fly Me To The Moon.” But especially the first note. And the way you pronounce “song” at 1:09. And the screams at 1:29 and 1:53. And the way you sing “Jupiter” each time. And your guitar sound at 1:38, definitely.

2.  The left-hand turn made three minutes and fourteen seconds into “That’s the Way I Feel About Cha.”

12.

seanhowe

seanhowe:

Cinematographer Gordon Willis, 1931-2014.

Chris McCoy recently spoke with the rarely interviewed Willis; the conversation appears in the May 2014 issue of The Believer.

"Woody actually contacted me a few years ago. He wanted to do something in New York. I said, ‘I’m sorry, my eyesight is now at a point where I can’t do it for you.’ I said, ‘All women look beautiful to me now.’"

(Images from The Godfather, The Parallax View, All the President’s Men, Annie Hall, Manhattan, Pennies from Heaven, and Broadway Danny Rose.)